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The More the Merrier and WWII

I just read the most wonderful, detailed, discussion of The More the Merrier at Another Old Movie Blog.  As you can probably tell from my blog’s header, The More the Merrier is one of my favorite movies, and one I’m always trying to talk other people into watching.

So much so that when the grocery store had copies of it for sale, displayed side-by-side with lots of terrible old ’80s movies and sure to be ignored by 99.9% of my fellow Kroger shoppers, I was seriously tempted to buy the DVDs myself just to give them a good home.  Ha!  Really though, then I’d have extra copies to thrust at unsuspecting friends and family members, telling them to just watch it already.

Anyway, do check out the write-up on Another Old Movie Blog, preferably after having watched the film.  The post’s focus is not only on the comic and romantic plot points and the brilliant performances by Jean Arthur, Charles Coburn and Joel McCrea, but also on the World War II homefront setting of the movie.  Housing shortages, eligible man shortages, gasoline rationing, the bittersweet poignancy of wartime romance — it’s all there.

As great as the post is, I think my favorite part is this screencap of Joel McCrea.  I’m such a shallow person.

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4 thoughts on “The More the Merrier and WWII

  1. Yes! I do love this film. It’s so funny when they just barely keep avoiding each other. Despite the fact that it’s a marvelous comedy, it is also very sweet and poignant at times. And of course Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea, and Charles Coburn are all at the top of their game. Makes me want to watch it right now. Haha.

    • I love that part, too, with them both wandering around the apartment and coming so close to bumping into each other. Joel McCrea barking like a seal in the shower is so cute, as is seeing both he and Jean Arthur separately dancing the rumba. They’re obviously made for each other, as Mr. Dingle knew from the beginning! ;-)

      I think the blend of laugh-out-loud comedy with wartime melancholy is what makes me love this movie so much. I’m always simultaneously laughing and crying by the final scene.

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